Students can take classes from the following departments.
New Media Concentration
Broadcasting, Telecommunications and Mass Media | Link to Web Site
Film and Media Arts | Link to Web Site
Journalism | Link to Web Site
Theater | Link to Web Site


NMIC Course Descriptions

NMIC 001 Intro to Interdisciplinary New Media
3 credits
Professor Hana Iverson
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This is a foundation level course that looks at community, both on- line and in real life. The class will investigate public and private communication forms, social responsibility and roles, and the way in which media informs and influences these relationships. The final project will be to produce a class web site that is based on, but different from, existing on-line communities.
Student Work

Special Topics: Design and Visual Language
Adjunct Professor Elizabeth Kilroy

Exploring the principles of visual language and the concepts of graphic design for the web and print. Surveying all forms of graphic and interface design for advanced web-based projects. Design applications include Dreamweaver, ImageReady, Fireworks, Photoshop and Flash. Pre-requisite for Advanced Dynamic Web.
Syllabus

Special Topics: Advanced Dynamic Web
Elizabeth Kilroy (NMIC) and Howard Walowitz (CIS)

This combined course for NMIC and the department of Computer and Information Science will provide students with a critical, conceptual and practical understanding of dynamic web design principles and programming. Topics to be covered will include; interface and interactive design and coding (HTML, DHTML, CSS and JavaScript), and motion graphic principles using Flash and Actionscript. ?Students will work in cross-disciplinary teams to learn concepts and procedures together in a hands-on, interactive environment. Midway through the course, participants can choose the artistic or technical approach. They then create an advanced web site working with the appropriate tools. Emphasis will be placed on developing innovative projects.

Special Topcs: Toys of Life
Hana Iverson and Rolf Lakaemper (CIS)

In cooperation with the Department of Computer and Information Science, this new course will investigate social and spatial interaction with autonomous robotic toys (Lego Mindstorms). We will playfully invent, implement and evaluate models of human behavior that form the basis of social convention and interaction. Topics range from robotic science: mapping the spatial environment from given sensor data, to higher levels of behavior: how do we communicate with each other, and how do we react to our environment, e.g. used for player simulation in computer games. The collaboration between NMIC and CIS offers the opportunity to approach topics from different angles, inspiring creative ideas by teaming students of both departments. ?Students with little or no programming background will be guided to program their own robots.

Neighborhood Narratives
Hana Iverson

The Neighborhood Narratives curriculum explores the social and cultural impacts of the convergence of place and mobile technologies through techniques of interdisciplinary investigation. Students will use methods of cultural and visual anthropology to document facets of these neighborhoods with text, pictures and recordings. ?These place-based annotations will be connected and archived using a variety of digital technologies (primarily the web and mobile telephones). No prior technological expertise is required, as the predominant focus will be on creating and understanding different viewpoints about the city.

This project will link the international campuses of Temple University around a shared educational experience. Neighborhood Narratives classes at each participating campus will communicate with each other throughout the semester to share their varying methods and research results as they explore the everyday experience of their particular city. ?These networked group sessions will allow the students? own work to benefit from the different cultural approach that each campus offers.
Syllabus
www.neighborhoodnarratives.net

   

NMIC 002 Intro to Interdisciplinary New Media
3 credits
Professor Hana Iverson

This is a foundation level course that builds on the concept of community that was investigated in NMIC 001. From a localized on-line group community, we will now look at a larger public community, investigating how to engage with a broad audience. The class assignment will be to design and develop an interactive kiosk (free standing computer station) in public space.
Syllabus
Student Work

Special Topics: The Game of Life
Co-taught by Professors Hana Iverson (NMIC) and Sarah Drury (FMA)

Human-computer interaction will be explored within the dynamics of game parameters. Reviewing a broad sample of work that looks at media intersections with everyday reality across the fields of journalism, film, television, new media, theater and games. The final assignment will be to create a game that other people can play that creates an interface in real or virtual space (or a combination there-of). Pre-requisite for Advanced Game Design Fall '05 or Spring '06.
Syllabus

NMIC 0302 New Media Synthesis

A capstone course for students in the New Media Interdisciplinary Concentration. A studio and critique based class for the development of a portfolio project suitable for grant and school applications. Projects will be conceptualized, laid out in an information architecture structure, prototyoed and written about in a proposal format.
Syllabus

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Broadcasting, Telecommunications and Mass Media

BTMM 175 Introduction to Digital Audio
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This course is an introduction to sound design principles and recording techniques for multitrack production. As students examine design theory and technical practices, they learn the functioning and operation of the tools of the trade using lower-end digital audio workstations - microphones, mixing consoles, loudspeakers and audio tape recorders as well as rudimentary acoustical physics. Considerable time is also spent on critical listening skills and design aesthetics. Lab course.

     

BTMM 322/722 - Legal and Ethical Issues in New Media
3 credits
Jan Fernback
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This course begins with broad legal and ethical issues surrounding the mass media and includes case studies and issues dealing specifically with new media. The course examines issues such as copyright (intellectual property), privacy, and freedom of expression in the digital environment. Discussion course.
http://astro.temple.edu/~fernback/322.html

     

BTMM 349 Advanced Topics in Social Processes: New Media Theories and Issues
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This course focuses on communication theories and issues that apply to new media technologies. It examines informational uses and social consequences of new media, e-commerce, work in the information age, the digital divide and access questions, policy concerns, privacy, online security, copyright, democracy, and politics. Discussion course.

     

BTMM 364/764 Creating a Media Business
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

Principles of building one’s own media business. Student projects involve a start-to-finish plan for a profit or non-profit media organization including market assessment, financing, and contracting. Lab course.

     

BTMM 373 Making Corporate and Multi-Media Productions
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

The need to understand and create corporate and educational multi-media productions is rapidly expanding. From kiosks to video walls to the Internet, explore the development of material for a variety of audiences. Learn how to communicate and enhance your organization’s message through practical experience with advice from a professional. Lab course.

     

BTMM 375 Cybermedia Workshop
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

Hands-on development of content using new media forms. Students will be involved in the design, scripting, and production of one or more programs. Projects may include interactive programs, "edutainment" games, multimedia presentations, "Kiosk" information service appropriate for CD-ROM, online service, or broadband distribution to businesses, schools, or consumers. Lab course.

     

BTMM 545 Social History of Mass Communication
Topic: "Mapping New Media: The Social and Cultural History of New Media"
3 credits
Barry Vacker
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

The 1964 New York World's Fair celebrated the arrival of computers, telecommunications, and even cyberspace, with the Fair icon offering the first "map" of the electronic media world. In 1965, Jean-Luc Godard wrote and directed Alphaville, the New Wave classic that offered the first cinematic critique of computers and new media. In 1964, Marshall McLuhan heralded the arrival of the "global village," offering the first theoretical construct for mapping the social and cultural effects of electronic and digital media. In the ensuing 40 years, virtually all textual and cinematic models of the effects of new media ? computers, cyberspace, virtual reality, the Internet ? are situated on theoretical trajectories born in the Sixties. Employing a dual reading of seminal texts and classic films, this course examines the critical and cultural responses to new media, while situating contemporary media within the shifting terrains of the postmodern world.

Texts:
The Cyber Reader: Critical Readings for the Digital Era, Neil Spiller, ed. (Phaidon, 2002)
The Medium is the Massage, Marshall McLuhan (Hardwired, 1996)
Simulacra and Simulation, Jean Baudrillard (University of Michigan, 1981)

     

BTMM 339/588 New Media and the Popular Imagination
3 credits
Barry Vacker
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This course explores how "new media" have been situated in the public imagination, from computers to cyberspace to virtual reality. The course is organized according to decade, with students reading the textbook and online readings, in combination with viewing select videos, TV shows, and film clips. Students will critically examine the dreams and fears of computers in their everyday use, from science to education, government to commerce, media to entertainment. At the end of this course, students will understand how perceptions and expectations of new media have changed over the past six decades.

  • The Fifties: computers make debut in Hollywood film, in-part designed by engineers from Disneyland.
  • The Sixties:1964 World's Fair celebrates arrival of the space age and the information age, with computers for public use debuting at the Fair. Computers are immortalized in visions like 2001: A Space Odyssey.
  • The Seventies: computers transform over the decade, expanding from being tools for corporate accounting to video games in the household. PCs emerge from Silicon Valley.
  • The Eighties: PCs begin on the desktop and end on the laptop, transforming people like Bill Gates into billionaires while creating fears of Orwell's Big Brother.
  • The Nineties: Cyberspace, Amazon, and the Internet become household names, while millions create personal web pages and corporations embrace e-commerce. Webcams bring surveillance into the home, while singles mate via the computer. New media and mass media become almost interchangeable in the global media landscape.
  • The 2000s:Cynicism and uncertainty arise as NASDAQ and dotcoms collapse, yet new media still proliferate, from Hollywood to Wall Street to Main Street.
    Text: Computers: An Illustrated History, by Christian Wurster (Taschen Press, 2002).

  • BTMM 249 New Media Colloquium
    1 credit
    Barry Vacker
    Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

    It has been twenty years since the personal computer "moved in" the household, as portrayed in the Time cover of Jan 3, 1983. In this famed cover story, the editors at Time designated the computer to replace the person in becoming "the machine of the year." Two decades later, computers have permeated the fabric of culture and society, leaving very little untouched. This colloquium probes the ways computers and new media have permeated culture, focusing on several topics that are of current and future interest to undergraduate new media students ? e-commerce, movies, sports, war, surveillance, wearable computers, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence. In keeping with the spirit of the class, all readings are from online sources.

    BTMM 389 Advanced Topics: Broadband Authoring
    Susan Jacobson

    This is an advanced production course that will focus on creating innovative content for digital broadcasting and the broadband Internet. In 2007, the U.S. will adopt a digital broadcasting system that will have the potential to combine the audio-visual production qualities of HDTV and the functionality of the Internet. Using tools like Macromedia Director, Macromedia Fireworks and digital audio/video distribution technologies, students will create prototypes of broadband programming content and interfaces for digital TV and radio. We will assess the current status of the digital broadcasting industry, and look ahead to determine the forms that will define the next wave of its development.

    Prerequisites: Students must be proficient in one of the following: Web publishing, digital video production, digital audio production.

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    Film and Media Arts

    FMA 241 Experimental Video and Multi-Media
    3 credits
    Peter d'Agostino
    Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

    Intensive laboratory and field experience exploring personal, aesthetic, and social applications of video-utilizing camcorders, editing, and multi-media facilities. This course includes regularly scheduled screenings of significant experimental video and multimedia projects. Lab course.

    New Media Survey FMA 196
    NMIC 196
    Open to all SCT students
    Prof. Sarah Drury

    New media technologies and practices continue to change the way we communicate, entertain ourselves, get information, wage politics and war, engage with art, understand ourselves, each other and the world. How did we get here? This lecture course surveys the history, theory and practice of new media art and communications forms. The course draws on readings, the internet, media and speakers to look into the historical and cultural contexts embedded in media technologies. The computer will be studied as a vehicle that extends the body, mind and senses, social interactions and public space. the url for the syllabus is:
    http://isc.temple.edu/sdrury/survey

    FMA 245 Multimedia Production
    3 credits
    Sarah Drury
    Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

    This cross-disciplinary course introduces the concepts and techniques of interactive digital media. Students gain a diverse technical foundation through interactive telecommunications projects that both critique the negative trends of these media and explore the expanded human vision they offer. Concept areas will include: animation and sequential art; graphic & interface design; interaction design; hypermedia structures of storytelling; virtual spaces and communities; online publication; webcasting; authoring language basics; and Physical Computing. Lab course.

         

    FMA 292/BTMM 250:Production of Media Culture II/Media and Cultural Differences
    3 credits
    Teacher's name goes here
    Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

    Students will use principles of media literacy to use technology as an agent of expression about the world they inhabit. SCT students will work with William Penn High school students to collaborate on a multimedia project involving social change within the local community. Coursework will emphasize technology and social change; aspects of visual literacy; and media activism, and students will learn hands-on video production and web design techniques. Lab course.

         

    FMA 354/654 New Technologies Lab
    3 credits
    Peter d'Agostino
    Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

    Exploration, study, design, production, and implementation of hypermedia projects including interactive and computer controlled video, computer graphics, digital sound, videodisc, virtual reality, and other emerging technologies. Interdisciplinary collaborations will be encouraged between FMA, BTMM, Computer Science, Engineering, Architecture, Art and Music. Lab course.

         
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    Journalism

    JPRA 317 Intermedia Design, Writing and Analysis Production
    3 credits
    Teacher's name goes here
    Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

    An advanced multi-media course examining the production, design and theory of online advertising and public relations. Students opportunity to construct a comprehensive Web presence for a real-world client. Lab course.

         

    JOUR 518: Contemporary Issues in Journalism
    3 credits
    Andrew Mendelson
    Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

    No description available

         

    JOUR C055: Journalism and Society
    3 credits
    Andrew Mendelson
    Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

    No description available

         

    JOUR 381 Online Magazine
    3 credits
    Fabienne Darling-Wolf
    Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

    In this course students produce an entire issue of an online magazine as they would in the real world. They develop the magazine's concept and philosophy, research its audience, sell advertising, write copy and take photographs, and lay out and design the entire publication.

    JRPA 457 Publishing to the Internet
    Susan Jacobson

    This course will cover the basics of formatting and publishing journalistic stories for distribution on the Web. Students are assumed to have limited knowledge of digital media production, and a richer knowledge of journalistic practices. This course will provide students with an opportunity to experiment with new ways of telling stories that incorporate images, sounds and audience feedback loops as well as written text.

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    Theater

    Theater 390 Independent Studies in Sound
    3 credits
    Teacher's name goes here
    Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

    This course is an introduction to sound design and engineering for theater. Students learn the process of collecting and creating sounds, then engineering the production media via analog and digital methods.Lab course.

    Theater 353/551 Creativity in Lighting
    3 credits
    Teacher's name goes here
    Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

    This course explores places the lighting designer can go as starting points for the design process. Projects done in the Light Lab will be based on many ideas - reality, art, music, etc. The class focuses on projects, using new computer-aided techniques, with design principles growing out of the exercises. Lab course.

         

    Theater 319 Acting for Film and TV / FMA 322 Film Performance
    3 credits
    Teacher's name goes here
    Prerequisite: This course is designed for theater majors.

    This course is designed for theater majors to develop their skills before the camera. Actors are given experience in texts for commercials, soap operas, sit-coms, and film scenes, so that they are prepared for auditions in these areas. (Non-Theater majors must audition).

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