About Us

The New Media Interdisciplinary Concentration explores the expressive and communicative possibilities of digital media across the contexts of advertising, broadcast, film, journalism, mass communication, public relations, and Theater. NMIC facilitates students in the development of a comprehensive understanding of the communication arts, and an exploration of the established media traditions through the new technologies.

Integrating both media and content, the New Media Interdisciplinary Concentration considers not only how to work with the new technologies, but how to think about them in a cultural context. In addition to offering an in-depth introduction to new media production, the Concentration examines the impact of emerging technologies on commerce, education, communication, politics, the arts, entertainment and our overall cultural framework. Developing practical and conceptual relationships to both the history and future of new media, current explorations focus on interactive multi-media, convergence technologies, broadband content and delivery systems, experimental art forms, and the issues associated with digital culture.

Any new medium carries within it the seeds for new conceptual models and new means of interaction. The ability to translate all media into a digital realm breaks the boundaries that previously separated various disciplines. New media is inventing itself on the margins between art and science; film and journalism; theory and Theater; television and graphic design. It is in this interdisciplinary spirit that the New Media Interdisciplinary Concentration invites and facilitates collaborations across disciplines that aspire to invent new ideas and create divergent expression.

Contact Us

For more information about NMIC, please contact Director Hana Iverson, or Administration Coordinator Deborah Marshall.

Hana Iverson
Director NMIC/New Media Assistant Professor
E-mail address: h.iverson@temple.edu

Deborah Marshall
Administrative Coordinator
E-mail address: Augusta@temple.edu

The School of Communications and Theater offers periodic open houses for prospective students. For more information about the upcoming schedule, contact Linda Chorney.

Linda Chorney
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and Alumni Relations
E-mail address: Coppelia@temple.edu

Faculty

Peter D'Agostino (FMA)

Peter d'Agostino is professor of Film and Media Arts and director of the NewTechLab, teaching new media and experimental video courses. His pioneering video and interactive projects have been exhibited internationally in the form of installations, performances, telecommunications events, and broadcast productions. Recent surveys of his work include: Interactivity and Intervention, 1978-99 exhibited at the Lehman College Art Gallery, New York; and, Between Earth & Sky, 1973 / 2003 at the University of Paris I Pantheon-Sorbonne. Major group exhibitions include: The Whitney Museum of American Art (Biennial, and The American Century-Film and Video in America 1950-2000), the Sao Paulo Bienal, Brazil, and the Kwangju Biennial, Korea. His work is in the collection of The Museum of Modern Art and is distributed by Electronic Arts Intermix, New York.

Professor d'Agostino is a Fulbright Scholar (Brazil, 1996; Australia, 2003) currently serving on the senior specialist roster to 2005. He has also been awarded grants and fellowships from: the National Endowment for the Arts, Japan Foundation, Pew Trusts, Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, and the Center for Advanced Visual Studies, MIT. He was an artist-in-residence at the TV Laboratory, WNET, New York, the Banff Centre for the Arts, Canada, the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Center, Italy as well as a visiting artist at the National Center for SuperComputing Applications, University of Illinois, and the American Academy in Rome. His installations TransmissionS: In the WELL and VR/RV: a Recreational Vehicle in Virtual Reality received honorary awards for interactive art in 1990 and 1995 at Prix Ars Electronica, Linz, Austria.

D'Agostino's books include: Transmission: toward a post-television culture, The Un/Necessary Image. and TeleGuide-a Proposal for QUBE. He is also a contributor to Illuminating Video, and Theories and Documents of Contemporary Art. Recent publications featuring his work include Telematic Embrace: visionary theories of art, technology and consciousness, Video Art, and Digital Art.

Web: http://www.peterdagostino.net
E-mail: pda@temple.edu

Roderick Coover (FMA)

Roderick Coover teaches in the Department of Film and Media Arts at Temple University. He teaches courses in hypermedia, film and video.

Coover's works blend research in film and cross-cultural visual studies. They include the interactive CD-ROM Cultures in Webs: Working in Hypermedia with the Documentary Image, which is published by Eastgate Systems and the feature documentary DVD, Burgundy and the Language of Wine.

Coover spent two years in West Africa as a USIS Fulbight Research Fellow. His works made in Africa explored how power is negotiated through visual and expressive culture. With a grant from the Chicago Group on Modern France, Roderick Coover spent two years in Burgundy filmming in winemaking villages and conducting interviewers with winemakers and workers. He shot on 16mm color and black and white film and on digital video, using montage studies and sound to explore the spaces between the activities of the winemaker's work and the words by which their world is described. You can read an essay about his research at NMEDIAC, the on-line journal of media and culture. He is currently working on projects in Mexico and the US southwest.

Coover has also created numerous experimental multimedia works, including collaborations with the author Deb Olin Unferth for gallery installations and with the theater director, Ian Belton, for JoAnn Akalaitis' direction of the Iphigenia Cycle. His essays are published in the journals Visual Studies, Visual Anthropology, American Anthropologist, and Film Quarterly, among others.

Web: http://astro.temple.edu/~rcoover
E-mail: rcoover@temple.edu

Fabienne Darling-Wolf (JOUR)

Fabienne Darling-Wolf received her BA and MA from the University of Texas at Austin, and her Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. Her research explores issues of global cultural identity formation and the role of new communication technologies in this development. Most of her work focuses on the Japanese cultural environment because Japan is both highly influential on and highly influenced by the global multimedia environment in which popular culture is produced today. Her recent work has appeared in New Media and Society, the Journal of Communication Inquiry, Feminist Media Studies, Critical Studies in Media Communication, Popular Communication, the Asian Journal of Women's Studies, and in several book chapters.

E-mail: fdarling@temple.edu

Sarah Drury (FMA)

Sarah Drury is an Assistant Professor at Temple Universitys Film & Media Arts Program. She received a BA from Barnard College, an MPS at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU and an MA in Photography at the joint program of the International Center of Photography and NYU. She is a new media artist working with interactive video, song and lyrical narrative in forms including performative installation, wearable interfaces, interactive video and the artists book. Her installations, including "The Listening Microphone," "Voicebox," "Vocalalia" and ©-Intervention Chants,©~ explore the expressive qualities of the voice in interaction with video and sound. She has received grants including an NEA Artists Fellowship and from the TU Vice Provosts Research Initiative. Her work has been presented in national and international venues such as ISEA 2002, ACM Multimedia '98, Performative Sites 2001, the Brooklyn Museum, the Kitchen, Artists Space, Hallwalls, The Philadelphia Fringe Festival, The Worldwide Video Festival at the Hague and on PBS. Recent works include media design for "Violet Fire: a Multimedia Opera about Nikola Tesla," collaborating with filmmaker Jen Simmons, which includes interactive projections responding to the voices of opera singers. Her work on translating the energetic and sonic qualities of the voice into visual images led her to the design of assistive devices in the eVokability Project, using voice and movement input to enhance expressive possibilities for people with disabilities. Drury has been a faculty member of the NYU Art & Media Program and served on the faculty of the NYU Interactive Telecommunications Program.

E-mail: sdrury@temple.edu

Hana Iverson (Director, Producer-in-Residence)

Hana Iverson is a multi-media artist with a background in performance, photography and experimental video. Her photography and videos have been exhibited in galleries and festivals throughout North America and in Europe, and have won numerous awards. She is currently the Director of the New Media Interdisciplinary Concentration in the School of Communications and Theater at Temple University. A member of the faculty of the International Center of Photography/Bard College graduate program in advanced photographic studies, Iverson has taught workshops in Mexico and around the U.S. She has been a guest artist and/or lecturer at several universities including Temple University, the University of Colorado, Boulder, and the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Ms. Iverson holds a Masters Degree from the Interactive Telecommunications Program, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University.

Her recent work, View from the Balcony, began in 2000 as a site-specific installation at the Eldridge Street Synagogue (NYC), and closed at the end of 2003. The sound and video installation, located in an abandoned stairwell shaft of the historic building, has now extended into a networked environment. This project shares with her earlier work a grounding in the performative, using the body as nexus of experience and incorporating gestures of reconciliation, on personal and broader cultural levels. Ms. Iverson has received the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture award for 2002/03, the New York Foundation Artist-in-the-Schools grant in 2003 and generous support from the Covenant Foundation, to further develop the web component of the installation.

Web: http://www.communitynarratives.com
E-mail: h.iverson@temple.edu

Jan Fernback (BTMM)

Jan Fernback, Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder, is Assistant Professor in the Department of Broadcasting, Telecommunications and Mass Media at Temple University. She works primarily on the cultural, philosophical, and policy issues surrounding new communication technologies. Current work includes explorations of internet privacy; theory of cybercommunity; information technology in distressed urban communities; and the internet, democracy and the public sphere.

E-mail: fernback@temple.edu

Susan Jacobson (BTMM)

Susan Jacobson is an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Broadcasting, Telecommunications and Mass Media, where she teaches courses in digital broadcasting, Web journalism and student portfolio preparation. Her research focus is on digital broadcasting and web video, and her projects include an original hypertextual video project Countless Stories (http://countlessstories.com), which has been exhibited at the Streaming Cinema Festival, Digital Video Expo and other venues. She has also conducted several community webcasting projects in Phildelphia and New York City, working with organizations like Caroline's Comedy Club on Broadway, ComedySportz Philadelphia, and the Fluid Nightclub in Philadelphia. Professor Jacobson received a B.S. in Journalism from the University of Florida, an M.P.S from the Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University, and is currently completing her PhD in Arts and Humanities at NYU. She has spent several summers in the People's Republic of China conducting research for her dissertation project, Scrapbook of the Revolution (http://scrapbookoftherevolution.com). She has held full-time positions at The New York Times Company, Scholastic and GTE, where she was head of content development for GTE Mainstreet, an interactive television service. You can see what she is currently working on by visiting her blog, Escape from New York (see below).

Web: http://susanjacobson.livejournal.com
E-mail:susanj@temple.edu

Andrew Mendelson (JOUR)

Andrew Mendelson, Assistant Professor of Journalism, holds a Ph.D. from the University of Missouri, an M.A. from the University of Wisconsin and a B.A. from Marquette University. At Temple, Professor Mendelson teaches courses in journalism and society, photojournalism and documentary photography, visual literacy and visual culture, and research methods.

Andy's research interests focus on the role(s) that photographic messages play in society through a variety of media - film, advertising, television and journalism. He questions how we understand the world through the photograph and is interested in how that influences the construction of a viewpoint. He investigates the meanings in that construction and the resulting view of ourselves.

E-mail: amendels@astro.temple.edu

Barry Vacker (BTMM)

Barry Vacker is an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Broadcasting, Telecommunications and Mass Media. He received his PHD from the University of Austin, Texas. Barry writes about how utopia and dystopia are theorized in media, culture, and technology. His work applies an "arts and humanities" approach to critically explore the cultural vortex of aesthetics, technology, and mass media, all of which combine to shape the models of utopia and dystopia that, in turn, shape cultures around the world. Barry shares in Marshall McLuhans belief that there exist parallels between aesthetics and technology and that artworks can function as cultural probes, capable of revealing deep patterns of cultural change wrought by technological transformation. Thus, if we want to see where new media are ultimately destined, then we should not overlook the world of arts and aesthetics.

Web: http://www.barryvacker.net
Email: bvacker@temple.edu

Courses

Students can take classes from the following departments.
New Media Concentration
Broadcasting, Telecommunications and Mass Media
Film and Media Arts
Journalism
Theater

NMIC Course Descriptions Spring 2005
NMIC 002 Intro to Interdisciplinary New Media
3 credits
Professor Hana Iverson
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.
NMIC 002 055237
BTMM 189 055246
FMA 292 087681
JPRA 189 087694
3 credits
Monday and Wednesday 10:40 - 12:10

This is a foundation level course that builds on the concept of community that was investigated in NMIC 001. From a localized on-line group community, we will now look at a larger public community, investigating how to engage with a broad audience. The class assignment will be to design and develop an interactive kiosk (free standing computer station) in public space.

NMIC 0302 New Media Synthesis
NMIC 0302 053912
Professor Hana Iverson 4 credits
Thursday 10:00 - 2:00
Pre-requisite Intro to New Media 001 and 002 or equivalent

A capstone course for students in the New Media Interdisciplinary Concentration. A studio and critique based class for the development of a portfolio project suitable for grant and school applications. Projects will be conceptualized, laid out in an information architecture structure, prototyoed and written about in a proposal format.

Special Topics
The Game of Life
NMIC 393 082712
FMA 393 087718
FMA 902 087736
BTMM 389 087747
JPRA 393 087705
4 credits
Tuesday 10:00 - 2:00
No pre-requisite
Co-taught by Professors Hana Iverson (NMIC) and Sarah Drury (FMA)

Human-computer interaction will be explored within the dynamics of game parameters. Reviewing a broad sample of work that looks at media intersections with everyday reality across the fields of journalism, film, television, new media, theater and games. The final assignment will be to create a game that other people can play that creates an interface in real or virtual space (or a combination there-of). Pre-requisite for Advanced Game Design Fall '05 or Spring '06.

Special Topics
Design and Visual Language NMIC 0391, 088248
FMA 391, section 003 088256
4 credits
Wednesday 12:30 - 4:30
No pre-requisite
Adjunct Professor Elizabeth Kilroy

Exploring the principles of visual language and the concepts of graphic design for the web and print. Surveying all forms of graphic and interface design for advanced web-based projects. Design applications include Dreamweaver, ImageReady, Fireworks, Photoshop and Flash. Pre-requisite for Fall 2005 Advanced Dynamic Web offered as a collaboration class between the department of Computer and Information Science and NMIC. Upcoming new NMIC Classes Fall 2005: Advanced Dynamic Web, taught by Eizabeth Kilroy and Howard L. Walowitz (CIS) Virtual Spaces, taught by Hana Iverson and Rolf Lakaemper (CIS)

New Media Concentration
NMIC 001 Intro to Interdisciplinary New Media
3 credits
Hana Iverson
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This is a foundation level course that looks at community, both on-line and in real life. The class will investigate the notion of public and private, social responsibility and roles, and the way in which media informs and influences these relationships. The final project will be to produce a class web site that is based on, but different from, existing on-line communities.

Broadcasting, Telecommunications and Mass Media

BTMM 175 Introduction to Digital Audio
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This course is an introduction to sound design principles and recording techniques for multitrack production. As students examine design theory and technical practices, they learn the functioning and operation of the tools of the trade using lower-end digital audio workstations - microphones, mixing consoles, loudspeakers and audio tape recorders as well as rudimentary acoustical physics. Considerable time is also spent on critical listening skills and design aesthetics. Lab course.

BTMM 322/722 - Legal and Ethical Issues in New Media
3 credits
Jan Fernback
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This course begins with broad legal and ethical issues surrounding the mass media and includes case studies and issues dealing specifically with new media. The course examines issues such as copyright (intellectual property), privacy, and freedom of expression in the digital environment. Discussion course.
http://astro.temple.edu/~fernback/322.html

BTMM 349 Advanced Topics in Social Processes: New Media Theories and Issues
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This course focuses on communication theories and issues that apply to new media technologies. It examines informational uses and social consequences of new media, e-commerce, work in the information age, the digital divide and access questions, policy concerns, privacy, online security, copyright, democracy, and politics. Discussion course.

BTMM 364/764 Creating a Media Business
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

Principles of building oneŐs own media business. Student projects involve a start-to-finish plan for a profit or non-profit media organization including market assessment, financing, and contracting. Lab course.

BTMM 373 Making Corporate and Multi-Media Productions
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course
.

The need to understand and create corporate and educational multi-media productions is rapidly expanding. From kiosks to video walls to the Internet, explore the development of material for a variety of audiences. Learn how to communicate and enhance your organizationŐs message through practical experience with advice from a professional. Lab course.

BTMM 375 Cybermedia Workshop
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

Hands-on development of content using new media forms. Students will be involved in the design, scripting, and production of one or more programs. Projects may include interactive programs, "edutainment" games, multimedia presentations, "Kiosk" information service appropriate for CD-ROM, online service, or broadband distribution to businesses, schools, or consumers. Lab course.

BTMM 545 Social History of Mass Communication
Topic: "Mapping New Media: The Social and Cultural History of New Media"
3 credits
Barry Vacker
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course
.

The 1964 New York World's Fair celebrated the arrival of computers, telecommunications, and even cyberspace, with the Fair icon offering the first "map" of the electronic media world. In 1965, Jean-Luc Godard wrote and directed Alphaville, the New Wave classic that offered the first cinematic critique of computers and new media. In 1964, Marshall McLuhan heralded the arrival of the "global village," offering the first theoretical construct for mapping the social and cultural effects of electronic and digital media. In the ensuing 40 years, virtually all textual and cinematic models of the effects of new media „ computers, cyberspace, virtual reality, the Internet „ are situated on theoretical trajectories born in the Sixties. Employing a dual reading of seminal texts and classic films, this course examines the critical and cultural responses to new media, while situating contemporary media within the shifting terrains of the postmodern world.

Texts:
The Cyber Reader: Critical Readings for the Digital Era, Neil Spiller, ed. (Phaidon, 2002)
The Medium is the Massage, Marshall McLuhan (Hardwired, 1996)
Simulacra and Simulation, Jean Baudrillard (University of Michigan, 1981)

BTMM 339/588 New Media and the Popular Imagination
3 credits
Barry Vacker
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This course explores how "new media" have been situated in the public imagination, from computers to cyberspace to virtual reality. The course is organized according to decade, with students reading the textbook and online readings, in combination with viewing select videos, TV shows, and film clips. Students will critically examine the dreams and fears of computers in their everyday use, from science to education, government to commerce, media to entertainment. At the end of this course, students will understand how perceptions and expectations of new media have changed over the past six decades.

Text: Computers: An Illustrated History, by Christian Wurster (Taschen Press, 2002).

BTMM 249 New Media Colloquium
1 credit
Barry Vacker
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course
.

It has been twenty years since the personal computer "moved in" the household, as portrayed in the Time cover of Jan 3, 1983. In this famed cover story, the editors at Time designated the computer to replace the person in becoming "the machine of the year." Two decades later, computers have permeated the fabric of culture and society, leaving very little untouched. This colloquium probes the ways computers and new media have permeated culture, focusing on several topics that are of current and future interest to undergraduate new media students in e-commerce, movies, sports, war, surveillance, wearable computers, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence. In keeping with the spirit of the class, all readings are from online sources.

BTMM 389 Advanced Topics: Broadband Authoring
Susan Jacobson

This is an advanced production course that will focus on creating innovative content for digital broadcasting and the broadband Internet. In 2007, the U.S. will adopt a digital broadcasting system that will have the potential to combine the audio-visual production qualities of HDTV and the functionality of the Internet. Using tools like Macromedia Director, Macromedia Fireworks and digital audio/video distribution technologies, students will create prototypes of broadband programming content and interfaces for digital TV and radio. We will assess the current status of the digital broadcasting industry, and look ahead to determine the forms that will define the next wave of its development.

Prerequisites: Students must be proficient in one of the following: Web publishing, digital video production, digital audio production.

Film and Media Arts
FMA 241 Experimental Video and Multi-Media
3 credits
Peter d'Agostino
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

Intensive laboratory and field experience exploring personal, aesthetic, and social applications of video-utilizing camcorders, editing, and multi-media facilities. This course includes regularly scheduled screenings of significant experimental video and multimedia projects. Lab course.

FMA 245 Multimedia Production
3 credits
Sarah Drury
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This cross-disciplinary course introduces the concepts and techniques of interactive digital media. Students gain a diverse technical foundation through interactive telecommunications projects that both critique the negative trends of these media and explore the expanded human vision they offer. Concept areas will include: animation and sequential art; graphic & interface design; interaction design; hypermedia structures of storytelling; virtual spaces and communities; online publication; webcasting; authoring language basics; and Physical Computing. Lab course.

FMA 292/BTMM 250:Production of Media Culture II/Media and Cultural Differences
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

Students will use principles of media literacy to use technology as an agent of expression about the world they inhabit. SCT students will work with William Penn High school students to collaborate on a multimedia project involving social change within the local community. Coursework will emphasize technology and social change; aspects of visual literacy; and media activism, and students will learn hands-on video production and web design techniques. Lab course.

FMA 354/654 New Technologies Lab
3 credits
Peter d'Agostino
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this cours
e.

Exploration, study, design, production, and implementation of hypermedia projects including interactive and computer controlled video, computer graphics, digital sound, videodisc, virtual reality, and other emerging technologies. Interdisciplinary collaborations will be encouraged between FMA, BTMM, Computer Science, Engineering, Architecture, Art and Music. Lab course.

Journalism

JPRA 317 Intermedia Design, Writing and Analysis Production
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

An advanced multi-media course examining the production, design and theory of online advertising and public relations. Students opportunity to construct a comprehensive Web presence for a real-world client. Lab course.

JOUR 518: Contemporary Issues in Journalism
3 credits
Andrew Mendelson
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

No description available

JOUR C055: Journalism and Society
3 credits
Andrew Mendelson
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

No description available

JOUR 381 Online Magazine
3 credits
Fabienne Darling-Wolf
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

In this course students produce an entire issue of an online magazine as they would in the real world. They develop the magazine's concept and philosophy, research its audience, sell advertising, write copy and take photographs, and lay out and design the entire publication. http://www.temple.edu/philapeople

JRPA 457 Publishing to the Internet
Susan Jacobson

This course will cover the basics of formatting and publishing journalistic stories for distribution on the Web. Students are assumed to have limited knowledge of digital media production, and a richer knowledge of journalistic practices. This course will provide students with an opportunity to experiment with new ways of telling stories that incorporate images, sounds and audience feedback loops as well as written text.

Theater

Theater 390 Independent Studies in Sound
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This course is an introduction to sound design and engineering for theater. Students learn the process of collecting and creating sounds, then engineering the production media via analog and digital methods.Lab course.

Theater 353/551 Creativity in Lighting
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: No prerequisites for this course.

This course explores places the lighting designer can go as starting points for the design process. Projects done in the Light Lab will be based on many ideas - reality, art, music, etc. The class focuses on projects, using new computer-aided techniques, with design principles growing out of the exercises. Lab course.

Theater 319 Acting for Film and TV / FMA 322 Film Performance
3 credits
Teacher's name goes here
Prerequisite: This course is designed for theater majors.

This course is designed for theater majors to develop their skills before the camera. Actors are given experience in texts for commercials, soap operas, sit-coms, and film scenes, so that they are prepared for auditions in these areas. (Non-Theater majors must audition).